20 PEOPLE ARE FORCIBLY DISPLACED EVERY 1 MINUTE AS A RESULT OF CONFLICT OR PERSECUTION

In the fiscal year ending in Spetember 2016, the US admitted 84,995 refugees.


Over the past 16 years, 14,000 refugees from 36 countries have resettled in Wisconsin.

What We Believe To Be The Top Three Refugee Needs:

Literacy

Meaningful Employment

Wellness

LITERACY

In Wisconsin, disciplinary literacy is defined as the confluence of content knowledge, experiences, and skills merged with the ability to read, write, listen, speak, think critically, and perform in a way that is meaningful within the context of a given field [SOURCE].


Only 7% of arriving refugees have the ability to speak "good" english.


The unemployment rate for people with low-literacy levels is 26%, compared to only 4% with competent literacy.


Low levels of literacy impedes on many of the basic elements of refugees self sufficiency, including their ability to find stable jobs.

MEANINGFUL EMPLOYMENT

44% of refugees are classified low-income, compared to 33% of the US-born population.


Between 2009-2011, even after 20 years of US residence, refugees' average household income was only 85% of the US average.


Just 5-10% of refugees advance their education during their first 20 years in the US.

We believe that meaningful employment can solidify an individual's relationship with their community.

WELLNESS

Wellness is multidimensional and holistic, encompassing lifestyle, mental and spiritual well-being, and the environment [SOURCE].

 

Many refugees suffer not only from infectious, communicable, non‐communicable or chronic diseases, but also from severe mental health problems owing to stress and traumatic experiences.


The full scale of the mental health problem has only recently been recognized in Germany, where at least 50% of all refugees suffer from some form of definable mental illness.


Malnutrition affects 19.3% of children under the age of 4.


Issues presented for Milwaukee city more often have nuances reflecting racial and ethnic inequities or disparities in access to services.